Triple Ace Games Forum Index Triple Ace Games
ARCHIVE FORUM - POSTING LOCKED
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Terrain we use...

 
This forum is locked: you cannot post, reply to, or edit topics.   This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.    Triple Ace Games Forum Index -> Terrain Building, Minis & Figure Flats
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
TAG Wiggy

Triple Ace


Joined: 11 Jun 2008
Posts: 5112
Location: I have flying monkeys, and I'm not afraid to use them!

PostPosted: Sun Dec 07, 2008 3:25 am    Post subject: Terrain we use... Reply with quote

In a similar vein to the figure thread...

Purchased...
A village made up of nine Conflix resin buildings (darn perfect for Rippers and Hellfrost).
D&D maps (lots and lots of these--handy for a variety of games/settings).
Dungeon tiles/floorplans (both the older style and the new Paizo ones)--the Tournament set was perfect for Daring Tales of Chivalry #2, and the graveyard pack gets a lot of Rippers usage.

Scratchbuilt Stuff:
Cathedral and additional bits (by TAG Steve)--ideal for Necropolis.
Flat-top hill with removable top to reveal crypt inside (TAG Steve)--perfect for Hellfrost.
Ruined gatehouse (Jimbo)--will be great for Hellfrost.
Small industrial building (TAG Steve)---Necropolis terrain
_________________
Wiggy
TAG Creative Director
Check us out on Facebook for all the latest news!

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Wolverine

Deuce


Joined: 24 Nov 2008
Posts: 81
Location: Auckland, New Zealand

PostPosted: Sun Dec 07, 2008 6:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fat Dragon Games have a good selection of printable terrain, at reasonable prices too. Plus, if you're using figure flats (as opposed to lead minis), you can print them out on 'normal' paper without fear of crumpling.

(Oh, and they have a card T-Rex available, too!)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
TAG Steve

Artist


Joined: 15 Jun 2008
Posts: 377
Location: Shetland UK

PostPosted: Sun Dec 07, 2008 3:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mostly stuff made by me... I like making it.
I have got Necromunda buildings from years ago before I made my own and some Mordheim Buildings still on the sprue.

But I do love Worldworks stuff too. Got a whole draw of card printed ready to make. I made a Pulp city using their stuff. RAther enamoured of it.

I have a whole load of the different sets...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
Dragon Snack

Deuce


Joined: 13 Nov 2008
Posts: 38
Location: Mt Morris, NY

PostPosted: Mon Dec 08, 2008 6:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For RPGs we just use Tact-Tiles, since terrain seemed to get in the way when we used it. Every once in a while I will put something out (usually rocks) to denote possible cover, but I skip the walls and trees now.

For miniature games I use scratch built stuff, some of my own and some that Froggy left behind that I gave a good home.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
C.A.Pryde

Deuce


Joined: 19 Jun 2008
Posts: 135
Location: Houston, TX

PostPosted: Tue Dec 09, 2008 6:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

For Necropolis I use cardstock terrain from World Works, and I have been totally pleased with it. It is easy to assemble, and it looks awesome. They have a variety of stuff that works well for Necropolis; I would particularly point you towards the Mars Base set, as a starter.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
TAG Steve

Artist


Joined: 15 Jun 2008
Posts: 377
Location: Shetland UK

PostPosted: Tue Dec 09, 2008 12:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

C.A.Pryde wrote:
For Necropolis I use cardstock terrain from World Works, and I have been totally pleased with it. It is easy to assemble, and it looks awesome. They have a variety of stuff that works well for Necropolis; I would particularly point you towards the Mars Base set, as a starter.


Yep I have the Mars base, it is fab, well mine would be if it wasnt still in the flat pack state... Embarassed The mars hills you get with the sdet are really handy too. I have most of the modern city sets. They are really good too. I haver done some kit bashing to make a bank etc so that you can fight inside, typically they have now brought out a bank! Laughing
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
Jordan Peacock

Artist


Joined: 20 Jun 2008
Posts: 152
Location: Orlando, Florida

PostPosted: Tue Dec 09, 2008 4:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For terrain, I have a hot wire and some foam board for basing and simple forms, and Hirst Arts castings for buildings, dungeons, tomb interiors, bar room floor tiles, etc.

I just regret that I can't justify actually making full-fledged table terrain for RPG play, like I could back when I was more into miniatures wargaming. Wall sections tend to block line of sight for seated players - and my players generally aren't willing to stand up and look over the terrain to see where the miniatures are located. (It's a very different dynamic than for miniatures wargaming.) So most of my "dungeon tiles" are either just flat (but textured) floor tile pieces with the occasional obstruction (furniture, treasure pile, doorway, etc.) and only short representations of walls if at all.

The instructions on the Hirst Arts site for making dungeon sections tend to call for dungeon pieces with wall sections at least two blocks high (1"), but since my miniatures aren't much taller than that - and sometimes shorter - I've had to tend toward one-block-high wall sections - or 1/2".

The main exception to this would be pieces I think of as "GM screen display pieces" - that is, terrain pieces with a tall "back wall" that will be on my side of the table, so it wouldn't obstruct any player's view of miniatures in the play area. (Often, this would be for the transition between the outside adventure area, and the final showdown inside the tomb/temple/pirate's hideout/whatever, and once the PCs went inside, I'd remove the piece and do a "scene change" to represent the interior.)

I've done some experimenting with sculpting masters using Magic Sculp, and making molds with Latex Mold-Builder, and then making a caster's shroud from plaster (to help the latex mold hold its shape when making castings) to make custom large pieces to supplement the Hirst Arts blocks.

Here's a photo of an older project, back when I was running "Ironclaw" at Necronomicon in 2003. (All pictures in this post are clickable for larger versions.)



This was before Mr. Hirst came out with his Egyptian-themed mold sets. (I used those for my later "Barbary Coast" adventures.) So, the floor tiles pictured are regular "rough stone" Hirst Arts floor tiles, with plain blocks, the front area is just some cut foam, and the statues are duplicates of a custom piece I made. (The doorway is made from an impression of an old Grendel "Egyptian Tomb" set piece I've had for over a decade; the original didn't have an open doorway.)

(Work-in-progress piece with closed door):


(Picture of mold with part of the plaster (shroud) holding it, casting, and master):


For less involved pieces, I've sometimes made temporary impression molds using sculpey, plasticene, and other non-air-dry molding materials. The results are usually very low quality, but can still be useful for making interesting bits of dungeon decoration.

Perhaps the easiest is the "treasure coin pile." Just take a bit of putty and work it into a block with a more or less flat top surface, and then take a round peg (a piece of plastic model sprue, usually) with a flat end, and jam it into the putty repeatedly, until you form an impression of your "treasure pile." When you pour the casting material (Hydrocal, in my case) in, and it dries, you can remove it and you should have a "coin pile" - as all the impressions of the sprue come out looking like coins. Just paint it a darker base color (dark brown for gold or copper, black for silver), and then drybrush it with the appropriate metallic color for the coin type, and optionally add a few tiny bits of glitter-paint (enough for just one or two pieces of glitter per spot) to hint at coins in the pile.

(Sample of Sculpey mold, with piece of sprue used for making "coins"):


If you have a collection of "bitz" - spare weapons, etc. - those can be jammed into the temporary mold as well (after making the basic "coin pile" shape) to give the suggestion of treasure items sitting on top of (or partially buried in) the treasure pile. (Either that, or you could just glue "bitz" onto the pile afterward, but I like the option to reuse and save the piece for gluing on to an actual figure, rather than consigning it to the scenery.)

I've used similar methods for "random dungeon detritus" - temporary molds to make castings of discarded backpacks, dropped shields, bone piles, etc. The temporary molds only work well for items with very shallow details, however; too deep or recessed, and the item will tear up the "mold" as it comes out, or else the final casting is likely to suffer from a lot of bubbles in the casting material.

(Sample of coin piles made with a temporary Sculpey mold):


(Sample of "Gates of Hell" piece, under construction, with "trapped souls" custom doorway made with above method):


(Completed "Gates of Hell"; archway and statues are made from Hirst Arts molds; doorway created via "temporary Sculpey mold" method):


Oh yeah - and sometimes I can find "molds" in unexpected places. For instance, years ago I bought a "Tomb Raider" figure on clearance, because it came with an interesting "waterfall" back piece. (I did a conversion on the action figure to represent a friend's roleplaying character, and built a mini-diorama for it, and gave it to him as a gift ... while keeping the waterfall piece for myself. Wink ) Anyway, the "waterfall" piece was packaged in a piece of vacuform clear plastic that conformed to its shape - so I was able to actually use that piece of vacuform plastic as a mold (albeit a flimsy one) to make a couple of "waterfall" backdrop pieces.

(Example of "waterfall" pieces in use, in background.)

_________________
Wonderland No More Fan Material: http://greywolf.critter.net/wonderland.htm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
TAG Wiggy

Triple Ace


Joined: 11 Jun 2008
Posts: 5112
Location: I have flying monkeys, and I'm not afraid to use them!

PostPosted: Tue Dec 09, 2008 4:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You should write up some of these tips into a PDF so we can stick it up alongside Steve's modelling guides.
_________________
Wiggy
TAG Creative Director
Check us out on Facebook for all the latest news!

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
TAG Steve

Artist


Joined: 15 Jun 2008
Posts: 377
Location: Shetland UK

PostPosted: Tue Dec 09, 2008 8:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I love my hirst moulds...gone through 10kg of plaster so far. I have all of the fieldstone moulds including the new windmill one. Also have a lot of the gothic line too. I have the cavern floor mould and the accesory mould. I still havent got round to making my own moulds, I want to but havent really got a clue where to start so i too would be interested in a description of how to cast my own pieces. So any help would be greatly appreciated.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
Jordan Peacock

Artist


Joined: 20 Jun 2008
Posts: 152
Location: Orlando, Florida

PostPosted: Tue Dec 09, 2008 9:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TAG Steve wrote:
I still havent got round to making my own moulds, I want to but havent really got a clue where to start so i too would be interested in a description of how to cast my own pieces. So any help would be greatly appreciated.


For thorough tips on how to make your own molds and your own castings, nothing beats the tips on Mr. Hirst's own web site.

Mold-Making: http://www.hirstarts.com/moldmake/moldmaking.html

Casting Hirst Arts Blocks: http://www.hirstarts.com/casting/casting.html

My own methods, however, take a lot of shortcuts - in time and money. (I have enough to get my foot into the door of the hobby, to mangle a metaphor, but not enough to be as SERIOUS about it as some people.)

The Hirst Arts molds are expensive, and unfortunately I don't generally devote the time and attention required to get perfect castings out of the molds. Hence, I do far better at making ruins and dilapidated dungeons than I am at making nice, smooth and regular sci-fi buildings with Hirst Arts blocks (but then, if I wanted nice, smooth and regular sci-fi buildings, there are all sorts of crafting materials and techniques better suited to such subjects).

Most of my home-made molds are flexible latex molds, with a hard "shroud" that's supposed to reinforce the mold so it doesn't bulge out when the casting material is poured inside. However, that method invariably results in some sort of distortion. For some subjects, this is more visible than in others. (Generally, if the subject requires precise symmetry, high detail, and/or smooth and regular surfaces, there's just no cheap way around it - and Mr. Hirst's guides are the best way to go. For more "organic" subjects, or especially shallow castings, some of the cheaper methods can work sufficiently well.)
_________________
Wonderland No More Fan Material: http://greywolf.critter.net/wonderland.htm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
TAG Steve

Artist


Joined: 15 Jun 2008
Posts: 377
Location: Shetland UK

PostPosted: Wed Dec 10, 2008 4:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
My own methods, however, take a lot of shortcuts - in time and money. (I have enough to get my foot into the door of the hobby, to mangle a metaphor, but not enough to be as SERIOUS about it as some people.)


This is more what I am after... I just need someone to say yep thats how I do it and it works...

I was pondering the point of the extreanl block to stop the mould bulging. I wonder if a sand box would work... actually now I just wrote that I think the sand might push aganst the mould and cause problems that way...
See I need help.... Embarassed
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
TeknoMerk

Deuce


Joined: 20 Jun 2008
Posts: 36
Location: Austin, TX

PostPosted: Wed Dec 10, 2008 5:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wolverine wrote:
Fat Dragon Games have a good selection of printable terrain, at reasonable prices too. Plus, if you're using figure flats (as opposed to lead minis), you can print them out on 'normal' paper without fear of crumpling.

(Oh, and they have a card T-Rex available, too!)


I'm familiar with Fat Dragon Games products, but I haven't seen their figure flats. Would you be so kind as to point them out? Are they included with the terrain sets???

I would definitely like to check them out -- the T-Rex too!
_________________
<> TeknoMerk <>
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Wolverine

Deuce


Joined: 24 Nov 2008
Posts: 81
Location: Auckland, New Zealand

PostPosted: Wed Dec 10, 2008 6:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TeknoMerk wrote:
I'm familiar with Fat Dragon Games products, but I haven't seen their figure flats.


Ahh, sorry. As far as I know, FDG don't produce figure flats of their own. I referred to them in the generic sense, say if you had purchased some of the ones produced by TAG.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Jordan Peacock

Artist


Joined: 20 Jun 2008
Posts: 152
Location: Orlando, Florida

PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2008 2:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

TAG Steve wrote:
I was pondering the point of the extreanl block to stop the mould bulging. I wonder if a sand box would work... actually now I just wrote that I think the sand might push aganst the mould and cause problems that way...
See I need help.... Embarassed


You want a shroud that is going to be molded in place when you have the "master" (the original model) in the mold, and you don't want it to CHANGE at all once you remove it. If it's sand, or anything else, you don't really have any guarantee that it's going to hold the mold into the desired shape.

Now, for some objects, it just doesn't really matter. You could just hang the mold from a frame made from a cardboard box. Or, for really shallow projects, it might be able to just sit on the table by itself.

Anyway, I'll try putting together a guide on the latex mold-building when I get a chance, based on my own discoveries (and mistakes), but I'll need to get a few more photos. (I can show some of my previous projects, but I need to stage a few more, and it might be nice to start with an object of particular interest to one of the TAG settings.)
_________________
Wonderland No More Fan Material: http://greywolf.critter.net/wonderland.htm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
TAG Steve

Artist


Joined: 15 Jun 2008
Posts: 377
Location: Shetland UK

PostPosted: Fri Dec 12, 2008 12:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That would be great Jordan thanks. All other stuff is RTF moulds, which is pricey for just messing around with.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
Display posts from previous:   
This forum is locked: you cannot post, reply to, or edit topics.   This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.    Triple Ace Games Forum Index -> Terrain Building, Minis & Figure Flats All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group
Protected by Anti-Spam ACP